Tarotpedia:Style Guide

From Tarotpedia

Jump to: navigation, search

This style guide aims at achieving some consistency across Tarotpedia's growing pages, whilst at the same time attempting to be as inclusive as possible.

In an international community in which even English has numerous more local conventions, spelling, grammar and appelations (or even proper names) vary.

In addition, Tarotpedia faces a different type of challenge, that of specific nomenclature leading to the desired page. Tarot encompasses a vast subject, and a cross-historical and cross-cultural one at that.

Contents

Spelling and punctuation

spelling

UK, USA, Canadian, Australian, New Zealander, Indian and South African spellings have differing standardized spellings, or in some cases accept a variety of options. For example, 'standardised' and 'standardized'.

Unless there is a specific reason in the context of the article to choose a particular spelling, such as mentioning the 'archa-ic' reference of the term archaeology, please do not alter another contributer's spelling.

With time, there may however be a number of key terms that have a variety of accepted spelling that may be better standardized for both consistency and ease of search. As these arise, terms will be added to this list:

'Kabbalah' is to be used for 'Qabalah', 'Kabalah', 'Cabala' and its other variants, unless quoting or referencing the title of a work;

punctuation

book titles

All book titles need to have their main title with the first letter of each word capitalised, dropping, however, articles (such as 'The'). Book titles need to also be in italics.

for example:
in the book titled the little gigantic book of tarot: its history, uses, and symbols
is inserted as:
in the book titled ''[[Little Gigantic Book of Tarot: its history, uses, and symbols]]''
which results in:
in the book titled Little Gigantic Book of Tarot: its history, uses, and symbols
deck titles

Deck titles likewise need to have their main title with the first letter of each word capitalised, dropping, again, articles (such as 'The'). Deck titles, however, are not written in italics.

for example:
in the tarot of prague deck
is inserted as:
in the [[Tarot of Prague]]
which results in:
in the Tarot of Prague

ISBNs

ISBNs (in capital abbreviation) should be included wherever possible, and decks or books without such specifically mentioned. No spaces nor dashes should be included, but please do include the final 'X' if it exists.

for example:
isbn 08763748X and isbn 8776655
is inserted as:
ISBN 08763748X and ISBN 8776655
which results in:
ISBN 08763748X and ISBN 8776655

Artists and Authors

These each have Template pages that should be used to create new required pages.

The order should be Surname, First Name, and Other Initial for page titles, but may of course also be referred to by their first name or nickname (in rare circumstances only) within articles.

Only the first instance of a name in either a page, or in each section of a very long page, should be linked to that person's article-page.

for example:
Pamela 'Pixie' Colman Smith, in her undertaking the task, [etc]
is inserted as:
[[Colman Smith, Pamela|Pamela 'Pixie' Colman Smith]], in her undertaking the task,
which results in:
Pamela 'Pixie' Colman Smith, in her undertaking the task,

Tarot Group references

Major Deck Groups

All major deck groups have had significant influence in that either books, papers, or other decks have resulted as a consequence of these. In addition, there is at times the copyright usage of a specific title that may be used and best known within a region for a deck as published by a specific company, even when the deck itself may have been printed by a number of publishers.

Marseille Tarot

Variously referred to as Tarot de Marseille, Tarot of Marseilles, Tarots of Marseille (and more variations).

For consistency, Taropedia adopts the term Marseille Tarot when referring to the family of 'Tarot de Marseille-type decks'.

for example:
In the Marseille Tarot, the image of Justice usually has the upright sword at a slight angle, whether intentionally or [etc]
is inserted as:
In the [[Marseille Tarot]] , the image of Justice usually has the upright sword at a slight angle, whether intentionally or [etc]
which results in:
In the Marseille Tarot, the image of Justice usually has the upright sword at a slight angle, whether intentionally or [etc]

Waite-Smith Tarot

Variously referred to as the Waite, Rider-Waite, Waite-Colman Smith, Rider-Waite-Smith, Colman Smith, and further variations.

For consistency, Tarotpedia adopts the term Waite-Smith Tarot when referring to the specific deck designed and drawn by Waite and Colman Smith, whether published by Rider, US Games, or the other less common publishers who have essentially reproduced in line and colour the same deck.

There are also other decks that make usage of the same lines drawn by Pamela Colman Smith, though recolored. Those decks, unless referred to specifically (for example: Universal Waite), are discussed in the same manner.

In other words, where some others may in the past have used such a term as 'in the Rider-Waite', Taropedia would instead have 'in the Waite-Smith Tarot'.

for example:
The Popess or High Priestess image in the Waite-Smith Tarot shows a Kircher-like Tree of Life [etc]
is inserted as:
The [[Popess or High Priestess]] image in the [[Waite-Smith Tarot]] shows a [[Kabbalah and Tarot|Kircher-like Tree of Life]] [etc]
which results in:
The Popess or High Priestess image in the Waite-Smith Tarot shows a Kircher-like Tree of Life [etc]

Crowley-Harris Thoth Tarot

The term and title 'Thoth' to refer to Tarot antedates Crowley by over two hundred years, and the Etteilla deck has also been called by the same name.

When referring to the deck designed by Aleister Crowley and Lady Frieda Harris, Tarotpedia therefore uses the creators' surnames as well.

for example:
'Strength' is renamed 'Lust' in the Crowley-Harris Thoth Tarot[etc]
is inserted as:
'[[Strength]]' is renamed 'Lust' in the [[Crowley-Harris Thoth Tarot]] [etc]
which results in:
'Strength' is renamed 'Lust' in the Crowley-Harris Thoth Tarot, [etc]

Referencing Parts of the Deck

Trumps

These have variously been referred to as trumps, atouts, and major arcana.

There have also been significant online discussions as to their historical usage and game-playing referents. Important variations in terms of both usage and personal preferences abound.

For Tarotpedia, the generic term Trumps, includes the card usually called the Fool.

Court cards and Pip cards

As a group, these have often also been referred to as the 'minor arcana'.

Tarotpedia uses either court and pip cards when referring to the 56 cards in general, or Court cards or Pip cards as appropriate.

for example:
The court and pip cards in general may have derived from the Mamluk deck, though the Court cards have been increased from the three to four.
is inserted as:
The [[Court and Pip Cards|court and pip cards]] in general may have derived from the [[Mamluk deck]], though the [[court cards]] have been increased from the three to four.
which results in:
The court and pip cards in general may have derived from the Mamluk deck, though the court cards have been increased from the three to four.

Suits

Apart from the Trumps, the titles of the other four suits are Batons, Coins, Cups and Swords. When writing about specific decks within their own pages, the variation used (such as 'Sceptres' for batons), reference should also be included as to the more generic term.

for example:
In the Tarot for Bright Eyes, the suit of Light is equivalent to the suit of Swords [etc]
is inserted as:
In the [[Tarot for Bright Eyes]], the suit of [[Swords|Light]] is equivalent to the suit of [[Swords]]
which results in:
In the Tarot for Bright Eyes, the suit of Light is equivalent to the suit of Swords [etc]

Individual trump cards

In general, as many alternatives exist, the Marseille and Waite-Smith tarots forms should also be included. For a reference, see Tarot Cards

Personal tools
Tarot Books